In addition to engaging customers and inspiring employees, a powerful and clear brand purpose improves alignment throughout the organization and ensures consistent messaging across touchpoints. AkzoNobel’s Dulux, one of the world’s leading paint brands, offers a case in point. In 2006, AkzoNobel was operating a heavily decentralized business structured around local markets, with each local business setting its own brand and business goals and developing its own marketing mix. Not surprisingly, the outcome was inconsistent brand positioning and results; Dulux soared in some markets and floundered in others. In 2008, Dulux’s new global brand team pursued a sweeping program to understand how people perceived the brand across markets, paint’s purpose in their lives, and the human truths that inspired people to color their environments. From China, to India, to the UK, to Brazil, a consistent theme emerged: The colors around us powerfully influence how we feel. Dulux wasn’t selling cans of paint; it was selling “tins of optimism.” This new definition of Dulux’s brand purpose led to a marketing campaign, “Let’s Color.” It enlists volunteers, which now include more than 80% of AkzoNobel employees, and donates paint (more than half a million liters so far) to revitalize run-down urban neighborhoods, from the favelas of Rio to the streets of Jodhpur. In addition to aligning the once-decentralized marketing organization, Dulux’s purpose-driven approach has expanded its share in many markets.


Roses say romance, and that’s exactly what McCarthy and Wahlberg wanted the cake served at their August 31 wedding celebration near Chicago to convey. Covered with 12 dozen cascading red roses that started at the top and wound their way around, the six-tiered, white buttercream cake was a collaborative effort by the couple and baker Alain Roby of All Chocolate Kitchen. The cake was made with alternating layers of red velvet, vanilla custard creme brûlée and Roby’s famous devil’s food cake (a special request from the couple). And those amazing roses? They were made of sugar and edible!
In the past decade, what marketers do to engage customers has changed almost beyond recognition. With the possible exception of information technology, we can’t think of another discipline that has evolved so quickly. Tools and strategies that were cutting-edge just a few years ago are fast becoming obsolete, and new approaches are appearing every day.
Roses say romance, and that’s exactly what McCarthy and Wahlberg wanted the cake served at their August 31 wedding celebration near Chicago to convey. Covered with 12 dozen cascading red roses that started at the top and wound their way around, the six-tiered, white buttercream cake was a collaborative effort by the couple and baker Alain Roby of All Chocolate Kitchen. The cake was made with alternating layers of red velvet, vanilla custard creme brûlée and Roby’s famous devil’s food cake (a special request from the couple). And those amazing roses? They were made of sugar and edible!

Needs: Something necessary for people to live a healthy, stable and safe life. When needs remain unfulfilled, there is a clear adverse outcome: a dysfunction or death. Needs can be objective and physical, such as the need for food, water, and shelter; or subjective and psychological, such as the need to belong to a family or social group and the need for self-esteem.

Services marketing needs to account for the unique characteristics of services (i.e. intangibility, perishability, heterogeneity and the inseparability of production and consumption). In order to recognize the special challenges involved in selling services, as opposed to goods, some authors advocate extending the model to 7 Ps for service industries by adding; Process - the way in which orders are handled, customers are satisfied and the service is delivered; Physical Evidence - is tangible evidence with which customers interact and with the potential to impact on the customer's service experience; People -service personnel and other customers with whom customers interact and form part of the overall service experience.[51]


When in New Paltz, don't miss a trip to The Bakery. Residents consider The Bakery, with its rustic outdoor cafe and beautiful gardens, to be the center of social life in New Paltz,  a place to meet people, bump into old friends, or sit quietly and read the papers. Known since 1981 for great bagels, croissants, rolls, rugulah, danish and butter cookies, The Bakery includes a coffee bar and full lunch menu. Experience New Paltz! Visit The Bakery.

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