Sponge cakes (or foam cakes) are made from whipped eggs, sugar, and flour. They rely primarily on trapped air in a protein matrix (generally of beaten eggs) to provide leavening, sometimes with a bit of baking powder or other chemical leaven added as insurance. Sponge cakes are thought to be the oldest cakes made without yeast. An angel food cake is a white sponge cake that uses only the whites of the eggs and is traditionally baked in a tube pan. The French Génoise is a sponge cake that includes clarified butter. Highly decorated sponge cakes with lavish toppings are sometimes called gateau, the French word for cake.

As companies expand internationally, they inevitably reorganize to better balance the benefits of global scale with the need for local relevance. Our research shows that, as a result, the vast majority of brands are led much more centrally today than they were a few years ago. Companies are removing middle, often regional, layers and creating specialized “centers of excellence” that guide strategy and share best practices while drawing on needed resources wherever, and at whatever level, they exist in the organization. As companies pursue this approach, roles and processes need to be adapted.
Organizational orientation: In this sense, a firm's marketing department is often seen as of prime importance within the functional level of an organization. Information from an organization's marketing department would be used to guide the actions of other department's within the firm. As an example, a marketing department could ascertain (via marketing research) that consumers desired a new type of product, or a new usage for an existing product. With this in mind, the marketing department would inform the R&D department to create a prototype of a product/service based on consumers' new desires.

Organizational orientation: In this sense, a firm's marketing department is often seen as of prime importance within the functional level of an organization. Information from an organization's marketing department would be used to guide the actions of other department's within the firm. As an example, a marketing department could ascertain (via marketing research) that consumers desired a new type of product, or a new usage for an existing product. With this in mind, the marketing department would inform the R&D department to create a prototype of a product/service based on consumers' new desires.
Though social and digital media are rapidly transforming marketing and new tools emerge daily, in most firms the organization of the function hasn’t changed in 40 years. How should marketers revamp their strategies, structures, and capabilities to meet the new realities? To find out, the consultancy EffectiveBrands and its partners conducted a study involving 10,000 marketers from 92 countries, which examined what separated high-performing marketers from the pack.
This buttermilk crumb cake is a breakfast favorite when guests arrive. To make one day ahead: just bake, cool completely, and cover pan tightly in in aluminum foil. For an even more decadent treat, make this delicious glaze to drizzle over the cooled cake: Combine 1/2 cup powdered sugar, 3 teaspoons milk, and 1/2 teaspoon vanilla in a small bowl; and stir until smooth.  
To overcome the competitive marketplace, Regions Bank adopted a person-level, unified measurement model. Marketing Evolution's software allowed them to effectively measure the impact of both offline and online channels, identify the best messages to deliver to the right consumers, and ultimately, give them the ability to optimize their marketing while campaigns were live.
Marketing organizations traditionally have been populated by generalists, but particularly with the rise of social and digital marketing, a profusion of new specialist roles—such as digital privacy analysts and native-content editors—are emerging. We have found it useful to categorize marketing roles not by title (as the variety seems infinite) but as belonging to one of three broad types: “think” marketers, who apply analytic capabilities to tasks like data mining, media-mix modeling, and ROI optimization; “do” marketers, who develop content and design and lead production; and “feel” marketers, who focus on consumer interaction and engagement in roles from customer service to social media and online communities.
Sponge cakes (or foam cakes) are made from whipped eggs, sugar, and flour. They rely primarily on trapped air in a protein matrix (generally of beaten eggs) to provide leavening, sometimes with a bit of baking powder or other chemical leaven added as insurance. Sponge cakes are thought to be the oldest cakes made without yeast. An angel food cake is a white sponge cake that uses only the whites of the eggs and is traditionally baked in a tube pan. The French Génoise is a sponge cake that includes clarified butter. Highly decorated sponge cakes with lavish toppings are sometimes called gateau, the French word for cake.
Our research has identified five drivers of organizational effectiveness. The leaders of high-performing companies connect marketing to the business strategy and to the rest of the organization; inspire their organizations by engaging all levels with the brand purpose; focus their people on a few key priorities; organize agile, cross-functional teams; and build the internal capabilities needed for success.
Roses say romance, and that’s exactly what McCarthy and Wahlberg wanted the cake served at their August 31 wedding celebration near Chicago to convey. Covered with 12 dozen cascading red roses that started at the top and wound their way around, the six-tiered, white buttercream cake was a collaborative effort by the couple and baker Alain Roby of All Chocolate Kitchen. The cake was made with alternating layers of red velvet, vanilla custard creme brûlée and Roby’s famous devil’s food cake (a special request from the couple). And those amazing roses? They were made of sugar and edible!

Internet marketing presents both marketing practitioners and scholars with special challenges including: customer empowerment, new communication modes, real-time interactivity, access to global markets, high levels of market transparency and difficulty maintaining competitive advantages. While some scholars argue for an expanded marketing mix for internet marketing, most argue that entirely new models are required.[55]


During the 1940s, the discipline of marketing was in transition. Interest in the functional school of thought, which was primarily concerned with mapping the functions of marketing was waning while the managerial school of thought, which focussed on the problems and challenges confronting marketers was gaining ground.[34] The concept of marketers as "mixers of ingredients," was first introduced by James Culliton, a Professor at Harvard Business School.[35] At this time theorists began to develop checklists of the elements that made up the marketing mix, however, there was little agreement as to what should be included in the list. Many scholars and practitioners relied on lengthy classifications of factors that needed to be considered to understand consumer responses.[36] Neil Borden developed a complicated model in the late 1940s, based upon at least twelve different factors.[37]
Organizational orientation: In this sense, a firm's marketing department is often seen as of prime importance within the functional level of an organization. Information from an organization's marketing department would be used to guide the actions of other department's within the firm. As an example, a marketing department could ascertain (via marketing research) that consumers desired a new type of product, or a new usage for an existing product. With this in mind, the marketing department would inform the R&D department to create a prototype of a product/service based on consumers' new desires.
A fancy-schmancy tower of tiers wouldn’t have matched the country-cool vibe at the July 2 Montana wedding of the Full House star and his photographer girlfriend. Instead, their 100 guests, including his former costars John Stamos, Bob Saget and Candace Cameron Bure, were treated to a more casual cake that was “naked” (no frosting) and homemade (courtesy of the bride’s best friend’s mother). The chocolate layers were filled with salted caramel and the vanilla layers with raspberry sauce. Guests loved it so much, says the bride, “there wasn’t much left!”
Porto’s Bakery was born out of Rosa’s love for sharing her wonderful cakes and pastries with friends and family. Today the Porto family is still committed to using the finest ingredients from all over the world ensuring that quality remains the cornerstone of the Porto tradition. Rosa Porto is now retired, but her recipes and her high standard remain, including her motto “quality is the number one ingredient in everything we do”. Come visit our bakery and you will experience home baking at its best.
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